Herald Sun, Thursday, June 7, 2001

The One.Tel collapse

 Article : Magic fails to do the trick

 

Could golden monsters, tropical fish and badly positioned mirrors have contributed to the collapse of One.Tel?

Details emerged yesterday of the failed company’s reliance on ancient Chinese superstitions.

Mirrors were hung to deflect negative spirits.

Little golden statues with the head of a dragon and body of a horse were placed in pairs on windowsills to ward off evil.

Partitions and walls that could hinder the flow of energy were banned.

The telco spent thousands of dollars flying Melbourne based feng shui master Patrick Yang around the world to “balance” its offices.

Mr Yang, who has also advised the Bank of Melbourne and the National Australia Bank, said yesterday his work had protected staff and led to better results for One.Tel

“I’ve got a bit of a reputation in feng shui; that’s why they hired me after consulting the Chinese community,” he said yesterday.

Mr Yang, who was born in Vietnam and migrated to Australia in 1985, said he suggested lucky numbers for directors Jodee Rich and Brad Keeling.

“Brad and Jodee are born in different years. Some numbers are good for Brad and some are good for Jodee,” he said.

Mr Yang attributed the company’s failure to its rapid expansion rather than failed feng shui.

The Hoppers Crossing businessman was first approached by One.Tel in 1997 when the company set up shop in Melbourne.

“I helped them improve the business,” he said.

Mr rich and Mr Keeling were so happy, they hired him to visit One.Tel offices in London, Zurich and Hong Kong.

“I tell them which (buildings) can earn money, which one can lost money and give them a report, “ he said.

Mr Yang said he also visited Mr Rich’s Sydney house and helped his baby daughter sleep better.

He said a previous feng shui expert used by One.Tel had been ineffective and had charged too much.

He said he had billed the company less than $50,000 over three years.

One.Tel’s headquarters in Sydney have Hong Kong trained Mr Yang the most trouble.

One.Tel did not own the building and many of the changes he suggested could not be made.

Other feng shui consultants said yesterday this could have caused problems. Melbourne consultant Jodi Brunner said a “bits and pieces” approach to the ancient art wasn’t good.

“It’s a source of frustration when the client doesn’t do everything you suggest,” she said.

It also didn’t help when consultants were forced to work in existing buildings, she said.

Ms Brunner said the destiny of One.Tel must have been stronger than the forces of feng shui.

A key test of Master Yang’s work was whether those who hired him, Mr Rich and Mr Keeling, were prosperous.

“And they are – so it seems to have worked,” she said.

Authentic Feng Shui consultant Joy Emin said she knew One.Tel employees who’d been very happy in the building.

“The work they’d done was good for worker; they all seemed very pleased,” she said

“There were obviously other factors at play.”

Jodi Brunner holds a Master of Feng Shui with Master Joseph Yu, Feng Shui Research Center, Canada.  She is primarily a Feng Shui practitioner and trainer, also an accredited speaking member of the National Speakers Association of Australia and the founder of the FENG SHUI network.  Contact Jodi at www.fengshuimaster.com.au for more info.

Ó Copyright Jodi Brunner 2003 All Rights Reserved

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